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Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 4
Nonlin. Processes Geophys., 13, 393–400, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/npg-13-393-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

Special issue: Complex dynamics in geosciences: analysis techniques for observational...

Nonlin. Processes Geophys., 13, 393–400, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/npg-13-393-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  10 Aug 2006

10 Aug 2006

Statistical analysis of Stromboli VLP tremor in the band [0.1–0.5] Hz: some consequences for vibrating structures

E. De Lauro1, S. De Martino3,2,1, M. Falanga3,2,1, and M. Palo1 E. De Lauro et al.
  • 1Dipartimento di Fisica, Salerno University, via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA), Italy
  • 2INFM, unità di Salerno, via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA), Italy
  • 3INFN, gruppo collegato di Salerno, via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA), Italy

Abstract. We analyze time series of Strombolian volcanic tremor, focusing our attention on the frequency band [0.1–0.5] Hz (very long period (VLP) tremor). Although this frequency band is largely affected by noise, we evidence two significant components by using Independent Component Analysis with the frequencies, respectively, of ~0.2 and ~0.4 Hz. We show that these components display wavefield features similar to those of the high frequency Strombolian signals (>0.5 Hz). In fact, they are radially polarised and located within the crater area. This characterization is lost when an enhancement of energy appears. In this case, the presence of microseismic noise becomes relevant. Investigating the entire large data set available, we determine how microseismic noise influences the signals. We ascribe the microseismic noise source to Scirocco wind. Moreover, our analysis allows one to evidence that the Strombolian conduit vibrates like the asymmetric cavity associated with musical instruments generating self-sustained tones.

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